Thursday, January 19, 2012

IBM achieves breakthrough in data storage technology, creates world’s smallest storage device

Researchers at IBM have achieved a breakthrough in data storage technology by utilizing atomic-scale magnetic memory, creating the world's smallest storage device and perhaps revolutionizing the amount of data we can store on a single device in the future.
There has been some pretty neat stuff coming out of the IBM camp as of late. Earlier this week we got a glimpse of the company’s plans to further develop battery technology in electric cars. Now it looks like another research and development division at IBM is hard at work pushing the envelope, and expanding computer storage space on an atomic level.
IBM is calling it Atomic-scale magnetic memory, and it could very well revolutionize the amount of data we are able to store. According to IBM, at its current state, the computer you are working on takes 1 milliont atoms to store 1 bit of data. With IBM’s research efforts into atomic-scale magnetic memory, one bit of data would only require an array of 12 atoms. That’s quite the difference and opens up a world of possibilities.



Glenn A. Walsh, Project Director,
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