Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Solar Eclipse on Eve of Buhl Planetarium's 75th Anniversary

Photo from postcard sold at Buhl Planetarium in the 1970s, showing Buhl Planetariium fronted by the Allegheny Square Fountain
Photograph from the 1970s of Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute
of Popular Science with the fountain of Allegheny Square Plaza in the foreground.
Thursday's Partial Eclipse of the Sun falls on the eve of the 75th anniversary of
the dedication of Buhl Planetarium. (Image Source: Friends of the Zeiss)

By Glenn A. Walsh
Reporting for SpaceWatchtower

A Partial Eclipse of the Sun or Solar Eclipse, visible throughout most of North America, will occur Thursday Afternoon, 2014 October 23 between 3:37 and 7:52 p.m. EDT / 19:37 and 23:52 Coordinated Universal Time. This Solar Eclipse occurs on the eve of the 75th anniversary of the dedication of Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science.

The western portion of North America will receive the best view of this eclipse, while the eclipse occurs very close to sunset in the eastern part of the continent. Internet web-casts are the safest way to view a Solar Eclipse, and may be the only practical way for people in the eastern part of North America.

In south suburban Pittsburgh, safe public viewing, free-of-charge, of this Partial Solar Eclipse will be displayed, via a live Internet web-cast, in a meeting room of the Mount Lebanon Public Library, located at 16 Castle Shannon Boulevard near Washington Road at the southern end of the Mount Lebanon Uptown Business District. This special event is co-sponsored by Friends of the Zeiss and the Mount Lebanon Public Library.

Normally, Friends of the Zeiss would try to show the eclipse to the general public using a telescope on the Library grounds, weather-permitting. However, as the eclipse begins in the Pittsburgh region so close to sunset, regular telescope views of the eclipse are not practical. Hence, we are providing the public with an Internet web-cast of the event.

An Eclipse of the Sun or Solar Eclipse occurs at the New Moon phase of the Moon, when the Moon comes between the Earth and the Sun and blocks out some or all of the light from the Sun on part of the Earth's surface.

WARNING: Observing the Sun or a Solar Eclipse with a telescope, binoculars, or any other type of optical device should only be attempted by people who have received the proper training and possess the proper equipment to do so safely. Looking at the Sun or a Solar Eclipse without the proper training and special equipment would cause PERMANENT BLINDNESS INSTANTLY ! Blindness could come without pain, as there are no nerves in the eyes.

This Solar Eclipse occurs on the eve of the 75th anniversary of Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science, America's fifth major planetarium with the historic Zeiss II Planetarium Projector, the first such projector to be placed on an elevator. The Solar Eclipse event at the Mount Lebanon Public Library will include a celebration of the Buhl Planetarium milestone.

Friends of the Zeiss is a non-profit organization with the mission to promote Astronomy, Space, and related sciences as well as the history and preservation of the historic building, apparatus, and artifacts of Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science.

For people who cannot attend the Library Solar Eclipse event, the Solar Eclipse can be safely viewed at the following Internet web-casts:

Griffith Observatory, Los Angeles:
Link >>> http://new.livestream.com/GriffithObservatoryTV

Coca-Cola Space Science Center, Columbus GA: Link >>> http://www.ccssc.org/webcast.html

Slooh Community Observatory: Link >>> http://events.slooh.com/

For a method of safely viewing the Solar Eclipse, check-out this Internet web site:
Link >>> http://andrewcarnegie.tripod.com/solflyer2.htm . 
 
For further questions about safely viewing the Solar Eclipse, contact:
Electronic Mail >>> < solareclipse@planetarium.cc > or Telephone 412-561-7876.

More on the October 23 Solar Eclipse ---

"Two Eclipses in One Month!!" - Blog of James Mullaney, former Buhl Planetarium Curator of Exhibits & Astronomy: Link >>> http://blog.scientificsonline.com/2014/09/two-eclipses-in-one-month/

NASA ---
Link 1 >>> http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/17oct_sunseteclipse/
Link 2 >>> http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEsearch/SEsearchmap.php?Ecl=20141023

Wikipedia.org >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_October_23,_2014

News Release regarding the Library Solar Eclipse Event:
Link >>> http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/fotz/news/releases/NR-soleclipse20141023.html

More on the history of Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science:
Link >>> http://www.planetarium.cc

Source: Glenn A. Walsh, Reporting for SpaceWatchtower, a project of Friends of the Zeiss.

2014: 75th Year of Pittsburgh's Buhl Planetarium Historic Zeiss II Planetarium Projector at Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science.


Want to receive SpaceWatchtower blog posts in your inbox ?
Send request to < spacewatchtower@planetarium.cc >..

gaw

Glenn A. Walsh, Project Director,
Friends of the Zeiss < http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/fotz/ >
Electronic Mail - < gawalsh@planetarium.cc >
SpaceWatchtower Blog: < http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/ >
Also see: South Hills Backyard Astronomers Blog: < http://shbastronomers.blogspot.com/ >
Barnestormin: Writing, Essays, Pgh. News, & More: < http://www.barnestormin.blogspot.com/ >
About the SpaceWatchtower Editor / Author: < http://buhlplanetarium2.tripod.com/weblog/spacewatchtower/gaw/ >
SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS, ASTRONOMICAL CALENDAR:
< http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/#news >
Twitter: < https://twitter.com/spacewatchtower >
Facebook: < http://www.facebook.com/pages/SpaceWatchtower/238017839577841?sk=wall >
Author of History Web Sites on the Internet --
* Buhl Planetarium, Pittsburgh:
  < http://www.planetarium.cc >
* Adler Planetarium, Chicago:
  < http://adlerplanetarium.tripod.com >
* Astronomer, Educator, Optician John A. Brashear:
  < http://johnbrashear.tripod.com >
* Andrew Carnegie & Carnegie Libraries:
  < http://www.andrewcarnegie.cc >
* Civil War Museum of Andrew Carnegie Free Library:
  < http://garespypost.tripod.com >
* Duquesne Incline cable-car railway, Pittsburgh:
  < http://inclinedplane.tripod.com >
* Public Transit:
  < http://andrewcarnegie2.tripod.com/transit >

Saturday, October 18, 2014

'Beautiful' Orionid Meteor Shower Peaks Tuesday

Waking up before sunrise is a good way to get a head start on the day. On Oct. 21st, waking up before sunrise could stop you in your tracks.

Blame Halley’s Comet.  Every year in mid-to-late October, Earth passes through a stream of dusty debris from Comet Halley, and the pre-dawn sky can light up with a pretty display of shooting stars.

splash
Orionid meteors fly out of a radiant near the shoulder of Orion, the Hunter.  In this sky map, the radiant is denoted by a red dot. Although the meteors emerge from a single point, they can appear anywhere in the sky. Image credit: Dr. Tony Phillips [Larger image

"We expect to see about 20 meteors per hour when the shower peaks on Tuesday morning, Oct 21st," says Bill Cooke, the head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office.  "With no Moon to spoil the show, observing conditions should be ideal."

Because these meteors streak out of the constellation Orion, astronomers call them "Orionids."

"The Orionid meteor shower is not the strongest, but it is one of the most beautiful showers of the year," notes Cooke.

More - Link >>> http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/17oct_orionids/

Source: NASA Science News.

2014: 75th Year of Pittsburgh's Buhl Planetarium Historic Zeiss II Planetarium Projector at Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science.



Want to receive SpaceWatchtower blog posts in your inbox ?
Send request to < spacewatchtower@planetarium.cc >..

gaw

Glenn A. Walsh, Project Director,
Friends of the Zeiss < http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/fotz/ >
Electronic Mail - < gawalsh@planetarium.cc >
SpaceWatchtower Blog: < http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/ >
Also see: South Hills Backyard Astronomers Blog: < http://shbastronomers.blogspot.com/ >
Barnestormin: Writing, Essays, Pgh. News, & More: < http://www.barnestormin.blogspot.com/ >
About the SpaceWatchtower Editor / Author: < http://buhlplanetarium2.tripod.com/weblog/spacewatchtower/gaw/ >
SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS, ASTRONOMICAL CALENDAR:
< http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/#news >
Twitter: < https://twitter.com/spacewatchtower >
Facebook: < http://www.facebook.com/pages/SpaceWatchtower/238017839577841?sk=wall >
Author of History Web Sites on the Internet --
* Buhl Planetarium, Pittsburgh:
  < http://www.planetarium.cc >
* Adler Planetarium, Chicago:
  < http://adlerplanetarium.tripod.com >
* Astronomer, Educator, Optician John A. Brashear:
  < http://johnbrashear.tripod.com >
* Andrew Carnegie & Carnegie Libraries:
  < http://www.andrewcarnegie.cc >
* Civil War Museum of Andrew Carnegie Free Library:
  < http://garespypost.tripod.com >
* Duquesne Incline cable-car railway, Pittsburgh:
  < http://inclinedplane.tripod.com >
* Public Transit:
  < http://andrewcarnegie2.tripod.com/transit >

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Autumn Sun Glare Can Affect Drivers


(Image Source: National Weather Service, NOAA)

By Glenn A. Walsh
Reporting for SpaceWatchtower

The Sun affects life on Earth in many ways. In the early Autumn, it can have a negative affect on some people who drive motor vehicles: Autumn Sun Glare.

During the month of October, actually from the Autumnal Equinox on September 22 until the end of Daylight Saving Time on November 2, the Sun can be a danger to motorists. For commuters who drive any segment of highway directly east or west during morning and / or afternoon rush hours, the location of the rising or setting Sun near the horizon can cause momentary (or longer) virtual blindness.

Some Tips to Remain Safe When Driving with Autumn Sun Glare ---

* Be aware that other drivers may be blinded by sun glare.
* Wear quality, polarized sunglasses to help reduce glare.
* Ensure your windshield is clean before you start.
* Do not put reflective items on the dashboard.
* Increase the following distance behind the vehicle ahead of you, to allow three or more seconds between vehicles.
* Turning on headlights can help other motorists see you, as they are driving towards the Sun.
* If possible, use a travel route that mostly avoids east-west driving, unless east-west roads include shade from trees or buildings.
* Always stay aware !

If you live in a metropolitan area with train, subway, or bus service, you may want to try public transit on very sunny days. You may even save some money on gasoline and parking rates!

Source: Glenn A. Walsh, Reporting for SpaceWatchtower, a project of Friends of the Zeiss.

2014: 75th Year of Pittsburgh's Buhl Planetarium Historic Zeiss II Planetarium Projector at Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science.


Want to receive SpaceWatchtower blog posts in your inbox ?
Send request to < spacewatchtower@planetarium.cc >..

gaw

Glenn A. Walsh, Project Director,
Friends of the Zeiss < http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/fotz/ >
Electronic Mail - < gawalsh@planetarium.cc >
SpaceWatchtower Blog: < http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/ >
Also see: South Hills Backyard Astronomers Blog: < http://shbastronomers.blogspot.com/ >
Barnestormin: Writing, Essays, Pgh. News, & More: < http://www.barnestormin.blogspot.com/ >
About the SpaceWatchtower Editor / Author: < http://buhlplanetarium2.tripod.com/weblog/spacewatchtower/gaw/ >
SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS, ASTRONOMICAL CALENDAR:
< http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/#news >
Twitter: < https://twitter.com/spacewatchtower >
Facebook: < http://www.facebook.com/pages/SpaceWatchtower/238017839577841?sk=wall >
Author of History Web Sites on the Internet --
* Buhl Planetarium, Pittsburgh:
  < http://www.planetarium.cc >
* Adler Planetarium, Chicago:
  < http://adlerplanetarium.tripod.com >
* Astronomer, Educator, Optician John A. Brashear:
  < http://johnbrashear.tripod.com >
* Andrew Carnegie & Carnegie Libraries:
  < http://www.andrewcarnegie.cc >
* Civil War Museum of Andrew Carnegie Free Library:
  < http://garespypost.tripod.com >
* Duquesne Incline cable-car railway, Pittsburgh:
  < http://inclinedplane.tripod.com >
* Public Transit:
  < http://andrewcarnegie2.tripod.com/transit >

Sunday, October 12, 2014

1504: Lunar Eclipse Saves Columbus' Crew


  During a 1504 Total Lunar Eclipse, the natives of Jamaica cower in
  fear, as Christopher Columbus warns that his God is displeased with
  them.  (Image Source: Wikipedia.org )

By Glenn A. Walsh
Reporting for SpaceWatchtower

As we commemorate the day Christopher Columbus arrived in the Americas, we note how he saved his crew from starvation using astronomical information from an almanac.

Today (October 12) is the day known as Columbus Day, when we commemorate the 1492 arrival of Christopher Columbus' three-ship fleet in the Americas, which he thought was the Far East. As October 12 falls on a Sunday this year (2014), the official United States Federal Government observance of Columbus Day occurs tomorrow (October 13). In Canada, October 13 is also recognized as Thanksgiving Day, earlier than the American Thanksgiving Day (Fourth Thursday in November) due to the earlier harvest of the far northern latitudes.

Since the time man first set sail on the seas, navigation by the stars was a necessity. When Christopher Columbus set sail to find an ocean route to the Far East, by sailing west, he took with him an almanac authored by Abraham Zacuto, which included astronomical tables originally calculated by the German astronomer Regiomontanus (whose real name was Johannes Muller von Konigsberg).

During Columbus' fourth and last voyage to the Americas, he lost all four ships due to an epidemic of shipworms eating holes in the wooden ships. He was forced to beach the last two caravels on the northern coast of Jamaica on 1503 June 25. At first, the natives on Jamaica welcomed Columbus and his crew and provided them with food and other necessities, in return for items the crew could salvage from the ships.

After being marooned on Jamaica for about six months, half of Columbus' crew mutinied as well as robbing and murdering some of the natives. As the natives had also grown weary of supplying the unexpected castaways, Columbus and his crew faced famine.

Columbus came-up with an ingenious plan to save his crew. In Zacuto's almanac, Columbus noticed that a Total Eclipse of the Moon would occur on the evening of 1504 February 29 to March 1. Three days before the eclipse, Columbus met with the tribal Chief of the natives, telling him that the Christian God was angry with the Jamaican people for stopping the supply of food to Columbus and his men. Columbus told him that God would display his displeasure by all-but obliterating the rising Full Moon in three days. This Moon would be "inflamed with wrath" as an omen for what was to come for the Jamaican people.

On the predicted day and hour, the natives watched as the Moon rose with the lower edge missing. As the sky grew darker, they saw the Moon take-on a bloody-red appearance.

Ferdinand, Christopher Columbus' son, later wrote:

"The Indians observed this [the eclipse] and were so astonished and frightened that with great cries and lamentations they came running from all directions to the ships, carrying provisions and begging (...) and promising they would diligently supply all their needs in the future."

The natives begged Columbus to have his God restore the Moon. Columbus went to his cabin to "confer" with his God. He actually watched his hour-glass for the time the total phase of the eclipse would end. Just before the end of totality, Columbus reemerged from his cabin to announce to the natives that his God had pardoned them, and the Moon would slowly be restored to normal later in the night.

The Jamaican natives kept their word, and Columbus and his crew were well-supplied until a rescue ship from Hispaniola (today, the island that includes the Dominican Republic and Haiti) arrived on 1504 June 29. Columbus and his crew returned to Spain on 1504 November 7.

An interesting anecdote: When Mark Twain wrote his 1889 novel, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, he was inspired by Columbus' ploy to have his main character, Hank Morgan who had inadvertently time-traveled to the era of King Arthur and Merlin the Magician, saved from execution by predicting a solar eclipse, and, thus, claiming power over the Sun. However, Mark Twain never checked any almanacs while writing the novel, and no eclipse actually occurred on the date he used in the novel: A.D. 528 June 21.

Total Lunar Eclipse of 1504 February 29 to March 1 ---

NASA - Astronomical Details:
Link >>> http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/LEhistory/LEplot/LE1504Mar01T.pdf

More Information:
Space.com / Joe Rao - Link 1 >>> http://www.space.com/2729-lunar-eclipse-saved-columbus.html
Wikipedia - Link 2 >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_1504_lunar_eclipse

More on Lunar Eclipses: >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_eclipse

Related Blog Posts ---

Colorful, Early Wed. Morning Lunar Eclipse w/ Web-Casts (2014 Oct. 8):

Link >>> http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/2014/10/colorful-early-wed-morning-lunar-eclipse.html

 

U.S. to See 4 Total Lunar Eclipses in Year & A-Half  (2014 March 29):  

Link >>> http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/2014/03/us-to-see-4-total-lunar-eclipses-in.html


Source: Glenn A. Walsh, Reporting for SpaceWatchtower, a project of Friends of the Zeiss.

2014: 75th Year of Pittsburgh's Buhl Planetarium Historic Zeiss II Planetarium Projector at Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science.


Want to receive SpaceWatchtower blog posts in your inbox ?
Send request to < spacewatchtower@planetarium.cc >..

gaw

Glenn A. Walsh, Project Director,
Friends of the Zeiss < http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/fotz/ >
Electronic Mail - < gawalsh@planetarium.cc >
SpaceWatchtower Blog: < http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/ >
Also see: South Hills Backyard Astronomers Blog: < http://shbastronomers.blogspot.com/ >
Barnestormin: Writing, Essays, Pgh. News, & More: < http://www.barnestormin.blogspot.com/ >
About the SpaceWatchtower Editor / Author: < http://buhlplanetarium2.tripod.com/weblog/spacewatchtower/gaw/ >
SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS, ASTRONOMICAL CALENDAR:
< http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/#news >
Twitter: < https://twitter.com/spacewatchtower >
Facebook: < http://www.facebook.com/pages/SpaceWatchtower/238017839577841?sk=wall >
Author of History Web Sites on the Internet --
* Buhl Planetarium, Pittsburgh:
  < http://www.planetarium.cc >
* Adler Planetarium, Chicago:
  < http://adlerplanetarium.tripod.com >
* Astronomer, Educator, Optician John A. Brashear:
  < http://johnbrashear.tripod.com >
* Andrew Carnegie & Carnegie Libraries:
  < http://www.andrewcarnegie.cc >
* Civil War Museum of Andrew Carnegie Free Library:
  < http://garespypost.tripod.com >
* Duquesne Incline cable-car railway, Pittsburgh:
  < http://inclinedplane.tripod.com >
* Public Transit:
  < http://andrewcarnegie2.tripod.com/transit >

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Colorful, Early Wed. Morning Lunar Eclipse w/ Web-Casts

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                                       Play it
A new NASA ScienceCast video examines the red and turquoise colors sky watchers
can expect to see during the 2014 October 8, Total Lunar Eclipse.
(Image Source: NASA Science News)

By Glenn A. Walsh
Reporting for SpaceWatchtower

A very colorful Total Eclipse of the Moon will be visible over the Americas, Australia, and most of Asia this morning (Wednesday Morning, 2014 October 8). An Eclipse of the Moon or Lunar Eclipse is the type of eclipse that is safe to watch with the naked-eye, binoculars, or a telescope, weather-permitting. Where the weather does not permit direct viewing, or for other parts of the world where the eclipse would not be visible in the sky, there will be several live video web-casts available for people to follow the event.

Officially, this morning's eclipse begins at 4:15 a.m. EDT / 8:15 UTC with the beginning of the hard-to see penumbral portion of the eclipse. It continues until the end of the second penumbral eclipse segment at 9:33 a.m. EDT / 13:33 UTC. For the eastern portion of North America, sunlight will brighten the sky before this eclipse ends. Here are the major events of the eclipse:

Penumbral Eclipse Begins:  4:15:33 a.m. EDT /   8:15:33 UTC
Partial Eclipse Begins:         5:14:48 a.m. EDT /   9:14:48 UTC
Total Eclipse Begins:            6:25:10 a.m. EDT / 10:25:10 UTC
Moon Phase - Full Moon:     6:51 a.m. EDT / 10:51 UTC
Greatest Eclipse:                   6:54:36 a.m. EDT / 10:54:36 UTC
Total Eclipse Ends:               7:24:00 a.m. EDT / 11:24:00 UTC
Partial Eclipse Ends:             8:34:21 a.m. EDT / 12:34:21 UTC
Penumbral Eclipse Ends:      9:33:43 a.m. EDT / 13:33:43 UTC

This will be the second of four Total Lunar Eclipses, each one visible in at least part of the United States, over about a year and a-half, called a Tetrad of Total Lunar Eclipses. Lunar Eclipse Tetrads are sporadic and usually rare. There were no such Tetrads during the 300-year period of 1600 to 1900. However, this is the first of eight Tetrads in the 21st Century! The dates of the other three Total Lunar Eclipses of the current Tetrad are 2014 April 15, 2015 April 4, and 2015 September 28.

A Lunar Eclipse or Eclipse of the Moon is when the orbit of the Moon brings our natural satellite into the Earth's shadow, always near the time of a Full Moon. Unlike the Tetrad we are now experiencing, not all Lunar Eclipses are Total. Partial and Penumbral Lunar Eclipses also occur from time-to-time. However, all Total Lunar Eclipses include Partial and Penumbral phases of the Eclipse.

The October Full Moon is usually known as the Hunter's Moon, as it allowed hunters additional light for hunting as the Native Americans prepared for the Winter months. The Full Moon occurs this morning at 6:51 a.m. EDT / 10:51 UTC.

Often, particularly during the middle of a Total Eclipse of the Moon, the Moon will not disappear from view but can be seen with a reddish tint, what some call "blood red." If the Earth had no atmosphere, likely no sunlight would reach the Moon during a Total Lunar Eclipse, and the Moon might seem to disappear.

Although no direct sunlight reaches the Moon during a Total Lunar Eclipse, the Earth's atmosphere refracts the sunlight around our planet allowing a portion of the sunlight to continue to be transmitted to the Moon. However, the refracted light reaching the Moon is primarily in the red portion of the light spectrum, as with red-tinted sunrises and sunsets (during such a Total Lunar Eclipse, a person standing on the side of the Moon facing Earth could see all Earth sunrises and sunsets simultaneously, as they viewed the Earth in a Total Solar Eclipse !). Hence, it is red light that is reflected from the Moon back into your eyes during a Total Lunar Eclipse.

Web-Casts of the October 8 Total Lunar Eclipse:

Griffith Observatory, Los Angeles:
Link >>> http://new.livestream.com/GriffithObservatoryTV

PBS-TV Star Gazers from Reno: Link >>> http://www.ustream.tv/star-gazers-eclipse

Coca-Cola Space Science Center, Columbus GA: Link >>> http://www.ccssc.org/webcast.html

Slooh Community Observatory: Link >>> http://events.slooh.com/
 

More on the October 8 Total Lunar Eclipse ---

"Two Eclipses in One Month!!" - Blog of James Mullaney, former Buhl Planetarium Curator of Exhibits and Astronomy: Link >>> http://blog.scientificsonline.com/2014/09/two-eclipses-in-one-month/

"Colorful Lunar Eclipse" - NASA Science News:
Link >>> http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/18sep_lunareclipse/

October 8 Eclipse Details ---

Link 1 - NASA: >>>  http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OH2014.html#LE2014Oct08T
Link 2 - Wikipedia.org : >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/October_2014_lunar_eclipse

More on Lunar Eclipses: >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_eclipse

Related Blog Posts ---

Total Lunar Eclipse Early Tue. Morning w/ Web-Cast (2014 April 14):

Link >>> http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/2014/04/total-lunar-eclipse-early-tue-morning.html

 

U.S. to See 4 Total Lunar Eclipses in Year & A-Half  (2014 March 29): 

Link >>> http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/2014/03/us-to-see-4-total-lunar-eclipses-in.html

 

Source: Glenn A. Walsh, Reporting for SpaceWatchtower, a project of Friends of the Zeiss.

2014: 75th Year of Pittsburgh's Buhl Planetarium Historic Zeiss II Planetarium Projector at Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science.


Want to receive SpaceWatchtower blog posts in your inbox ?
Send request to < spacewatchtower@planetarium.cc >..

gaw

Glenn A. Walsh, Project Director,
Friends of the Zeiss < http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/fotz/ >
Electronic Mail - < gawalsh@planetarium.cc >
SpaceWatchtower Blog: < http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/ >
Also see: South Hills Backyard Astronomers Blog: < http://shbastronomers.blogspot.com/ >
Barnestormin: Writing, Essays, Pgh. News, & More: < http://www.barnestormin.blogspot.com/ >
About the SpaceWatchtower Editor / Author: < http://buhlplanetarium2.tripod.com/weblog/spacewatchtower/gaw/ >
SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS, ASTRONOMICAL CALENDAR:
< http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/#news >
Twitter: < https://twitter.com/spacewatchtower >
Facebook: < http://www.facebook.com/pages/SpaceWatchtower/238017839577841?sk=wall >
Author of History Web Sites on the Internet --
* Buhl Planetarium, Pittsburgh:
  < http://www.planetarium.cc >
* Adler Planetarium, Chicago:
  < http://adlerplanetarium.tripod.com >
* Astronomer, Educator, Optician John A. Brashear:
  < http://johnbrashear.tripod.com >
* Andrew Carnegie & Carnegie Libraries:
  < http://www.andrewcarnegie.cc >
* Civil War Museum of Andrew Carnegie Free Library:
  < http://garespypost.tripod.com >
* Duquesne Incline cable-car railway, Pittsburgh:
  < http://inclinedplane.tripod.com >
* Public Transit:
  < http://andrewcarnegie2.tripod.com/transit >

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Pitt UV Laser to Look for Life on Mars in 2020











 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portrait of Dr. Sandy Asher in the Asher Group Laser Lab in Oakland on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Technology using ultraviolet light to analyze and examine pieces of matter, invented by Sandy Asher, a distinguished professor of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh, is expected to be an integral part of a mission to Mars scheduled to take off in 2020.

 

 

 

When NASA's Mars 2020 Rover soars into space on a quest to answer whether life exists on the Red Planet, it will likely carry a little bit of Pittsburgh with it. 

Technology using ultraviolet light to analyze and examine pieces of matter, invented by Sandy Asher, a professor of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh, is expected to be an integral part of the mission. If successful, Asher said he expects that technology will “be on all interplanetary missions.” 

The Navy uses the technology to determine whether there are traces of explosives on an object, he said. It's been used to examine protein structures. Asher said that most diseases are caused by mutations in proteins, and understanding the protein structures could help in medical research.
Asher didn't have goals as lofty as Mars when he first began working on the technology, called UV Raman spectroscopy, more than 30 years ago. 

“I was looking at nearer-term things,” he said. Much of his research while at Pitt has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, which supplied more than $20 million. 

The laser technology will be integrated into the SHERLOC project, which stands for Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals. 


 Source: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

2014: 75th Year of Pittsburgh's Buhl Planetarium Historic Zeiss II Planetarium Projector at Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science.



Want to receive SpaceWatchtower blog posts in your inbox ?
Send request to < spacewatchtower@planetarium.cc >..

gaw

Glenn A. Walsh, Project Director,
Friends of the Zeiss < http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/fotz/ >
Electronic Mail - < gawalsh@planetarium.cc >
SpaceWatchtower Blog: < http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/ >
Also see: South Hills Backyard Astronomers Blog: < http://shbastronomers.blogspot.com/ >
Barnestormin: Writing, Essays, Pgh. News, & More: < http://www.barnestormin.blogspot.com/ >
About the SpaceWatchtower Editor / Author: < http://buhlplanetarium2.tripod.com/weblog/spacewatchtower/gaw/ >
SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS, ASTRONOMICAL CALENDAR:
< http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/#news >
Twitter: < https://twitter.com/spacewatchtower >
Facebook: < http://www.facebook.com/pages/SpaceWatchtower/238017839577841?sk=wall >
Author of History Web Sites on the Internet --
* Buhl Planetarium, Pittsburgh:
  < http://www.planetarium.cc >
* Adler Planetarium, Chicago:
  < http://adlerplanetarium.tripod.com >
* Astronomer, Educator, Optician John A. Brashear:
  < http://johnbrashear.tripod.com >
* Andrew Carnegie & Carnegie Libraries:
  < http://www.andrewcarnegie.cc >
* Civil War Museum of Andrew Carnegie Free Library:
  < http://garespypost.tripod.com >
* Duquesne Incline cable-car railway, Pittsburgh:
  < http://inclinedplane.tripod.com >
* Public Transit:
  < http://andrewcarnegie2.tripod.com/transit >

Saturday, October 4, 2014

NASA: Astronauts Going to Mars May Be in Deep Sleep







During interplanetary transit, the crew would receive low-level electrical impulses to key muscle groups to prevent muscular atrophy.

By Irene Klotz

A NASA-backed study explores an innovative way to dramatically cut the cost of a human expedition to Mars -- put the crew in stasis.

The deep sleep, called torpor, would reduce astronauts’ metabolic functions with existing medical procedures. Torpor also can occur naturally in cases of hypothermia.

“Therapeutic torpor has been around in theory since the 1980s and really since 2003 has been a staple for critical care trauma patients in hospitals," aerospace engineer Mark Schaffer, with SpaceWorks Enterprises in Atlanta, said at the International Astronomical Congress in Toronto this week.

More - Link >>> http://news.discovery.com/space/nasa-eyes-crew-deep-sleep-option-for-mission-to-mars-141003.htm

Source: Discovery Channel.

2014: 75th Year of Pittsburgh's Buhl Planetarium Historic Zeiss II Planetarium Projector at Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science.



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gaw

Glenn A. Walsh, Project Director,
Friends of the Zeiss < http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/fotz/ >
Electronic Mail - < gawalsh@planetarium.cc >
SpaceWatchtower Blog: < http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/ >
Also see: South Hills Backyard Astronomers Blog: < http://shbastronomers.blogspot.com/ >
Barnestormin: Writing, Essays, Pgh. News, & More: < http://www.barnestormin.blogspot.com/ >
About the SpaceWatchtower Editor / Author: < http://buhlplanetarium2.tripod.com/weblog/spacewatchtower/gaw/ >
SPACE & SCIENCE NEWS, ASTRONOMICAL CALENDAR:
< http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/#news >
Twitter: < https://twitter.com/spacewatchtower >
Facebook: < http://www.facebook.com/pages/SpaceWatchtower/238017839577841?sk=wall >
Author of History Web Sites on the Internet --
* Buhl Planetarium, Pittsburgh:
  < http://www.planetarium.cc >
* Adler Planetarium, Chicago:
  < http://adlerplanetarium.tripod.com >
* Astronomer, Educator, Optician John A. Brashear:
  < http://johnbrashear.tripod.com >
* Andrew Carnegie & Carnegie Libraries:
  < http://www.andrewcarnegie.cc >
* Civil War Museum of Andrew Carnegie Free Library:
  < http://garespypost.tripod.com >
* Duquesne Incline cable-car railway, Pittsburgh:
  < http://inclinedplane.tripod.com >
* Public Transit:
  < http://andrewcarnegie2.tripod.com/transit >