Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Time to give SETI a chance

Earth 2.0 is in our sights. Checking it for signs of life will be the next big issue
THE thousands of probable worlds discovered in orbit around other stars are making our corner of the universe appear a lot friendlier to life these days.
The Kepler space telescope, which has its eye on 150,000 stars, is beginning to home in on Earth-size planets. Can Earth 2.0 be far behind? What will it be like?
Earth 2.0 would be a rocky planet the size of our own, orbiting a star like the sun at a distance where the surface temperatures would allow liquid water oceans, assuming the planet was sheathed in an atmosphere containing greenhouse gases.

MORE: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21328510.300-time-to-give-seti-a-chance.html


Glenn A. Walsh, Project Director,
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