Sunday, January 8, 2012

How 2012's Full Moons Got Their Strange Names

Date: 06 January 2012 Time: 04:55 PM ET
Biggest and Brightest Full Moon of 2010 Tonight
An enhanced image of the Moon taken with the NOAO Mosaic CCD camera using two NSF telescopes at Kitt Peak National Observatory. The Moon is superimposed on a separate image of the sky.
The start of 2012 brings with it a new year of skywatching, and lunar enthusiasts are gearing up for a stunning lineup of full moons. But, where does the tradition of full moon names come from?
Full moon names date back to Native Americans of a few hundred years ago, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. To keep track of the changing seasons, these tribes gave distinctive names to each recurring full moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred.



Glenn A. Walsh, Project Director,
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